DR. MARIAN YL WONG

 

SENIOR LECTURER

My research interests lie in the behavioural ecology and conservation behaviour of social fishes. My lab uses social fishes from both marine and freshwater environments as model species to test key hypotheses related to the evolution of conflict, cooperation, group-living and mating systems. The techniques we use range from observational and experimental approaches in the field to physiological assessments of underlying proximate mechanisms in the laboratory. We are also interested in understanding the impacts of abiotic stressors on the behaviour of social fishes and how this impacts higher levels of their social organisation. Therefore, my lab draws on a wide variety of techniques to address both pure and applied questions in behavioural ecology. I welcome any enquiries from prospective undergraduates, postgraduates, post-docs and collaborators who may be interested in these lines of research.

1998-2002
BA Zoology
University of Cambridge
U.K.
2003-2007
PhD Marine Biology
James Cook University
Australia
2008-2011
Postdoctoral fellowship
McMaster University
Canada
2011-2012
Postdoctoral fellowship
Boston University
U.S.A

EDUCATION

LATEST RESEARCH

LATEST RESEARCH

Using the humbug damselfish (Dascyllus aruanus), a common reef fish found at Lizard Island (Qld), we are currently testing theories of social evolution using social network theory to quantify direct and indirect behavioural interactions. This investigation forms the PhD research of Rebecca Branconi, in collaboration with Dr. Peter Buston (Boston University, USA) and Dr. Daniel Stouffer (University of Canterbury, NZ).

Using the humbug damselfish (Dascyllus aruanus), a common reef fish found at Lizard Island (Qld), we are currently testing theories of social evolution using social network theory to quantify direct and indirect behavioural interactions. This investigation forms the PhD research of Rebecca Branconi, in collaboration with Dr. Peter Buston (Boston University, USA) and Dr. Daniel Stouffer (University of Canterbury, NZ).

Using rockpool fishes, including the blenny (Lepidoblennius haplodactylus) and goby (Bathygobius cocosensis), we are investigating the behavioural mechanisms that underlie species coexistence and community structure along the rocky shore across the Illawarra region. This investigation currently forms the honours projects of 3 UOW students - Pearl Ible, Paul Gordon and Dan Colella

RECENT MEDIA RELEASES